Find Your Weight Loss Fingerprint

09 Dec Find Your Weight Loss Fingerprint

I’ve helped thousands of people find their weight loss fingerprint. It started when I was the Director of Advocacy for Weight Watchers and led me to realizing you have to make a weight loss plan work for you, not the other way around.

Don’t be afraid to make mistakes and don’t try to copy someone else’s work! Every body is different, so what works for your best friend may not be true for you. This is your fingerprint for weight loss and maintenance. You already have what you need to unlock your success; you just need to stop listening to anyone but yourself (OK maybe listen to me, but only the ideas that make sense to you). Starting now, you are designing your own version of what works starting with these 3 steps!

Begin With a Backpack

Not literally, but imagine being handed a backpack that’s there for you to collect all of the great ideas you see and hear in everyday life. It is imperative you take these ideas, tips and recipes with you, unpack them and try them on. Some of the things you bring home won’t fit, and it’s fine to toss them out! Just because an idea or recipe changed someone else’s life doesn’t mean that it will work for you. If something isn’t working for you, move on!

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Let Yourself Evolve

For instance, at first you make changes to the spaces where you make food decision. Perhaps you decide to throw away the cookies from your pantry in an effort not to be tempted by them. That leads you to eat less after the kids go to sleep, which leads you to begin to feel that you are capable of making these changes. As you make those tweaks, the pounds can start to come off, and you believe you will lose the weight this time.

Make Errors

Try visualizing weight loss as a staircase that leads you to success. Every change gets you to another step toward the top, but it needed the previous step as its foundation. Building and climbing your staircase takes some effort, concentration and balance. It’s a living, breathing process, because you will keep building the stairs as you discover things about yourself and as changes happen in your environment or life.